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The Evernote Hack – After the Panic

Evernote emailThis weekend Evernote became the latest cloud vendor to have its systems breached; user data including passwords has been compromised. In case this is news to you, a quick recap – Evernote assured us that passwords were correctly hashed and salted unlike LinkedIn, who neglected to salt their passwords. Evernote didn’t tell us whether or not the salts were compromised too. The attack “follows a similar pattern” to others so we can assume some sort of long term APT style compromise.

There are a couple of interesting observations one can make as a result of this last hack.

The usual amount of your-data-in-the-cloud-is-not-secure media hysteria has been dished out; no doubt some Evernote users will be busy deleting their notes as a result, even though their contents are probably as interesting as the ingredients list on a bottle of water. Being an Evernote user (yes, I have reset my password) I can’t help but think this isn’t about data in the cloud, or about the cloud at all; this is more about a target. Evernote was the target in this instance, before them it has been LinkedIn, Facebook, Yahoo, RSA Security, New York Times, Iranian nuclear centrifuges, the list goes on. Once the target has been identified this sort of “coordinated attempt to access secure areas” is likely to succeed regardless of the data’s location. The data could be anywhere; in the cloud, a server on your LAN, one of your users’ laptops (Facebook), a mobile device, a filling cabinet (remember those) or even data left on someone’s desk – the attackers will use whatever means they need to compromise that data.

Secondly, if there is weak security protecting that data, again the location is unimportant. Putting the data in the cloud on a dedicated platform means, as in Evernote’s case, the breach can be monitored and contained by people who’s job it is to do that. There is very little one can do to contain the old school espionage attack that reads secure material from your desk or even from your rubbish bin.

Evernote did the right thing and alerted its users to the hack, emailing them to advise password resets. They did slip up slightly though, by providing a link in the same email that also suggests users should “Never click on ‘reset password’ requests in emails — instead go directly to the service”. But to be fair, this is the first time Evernote has had to deal with this threat.

What this sequence of events really means is that 2013 could be the year that cloud service providers will rebalance their priorities, so that preparedness for attacks will be as important as getting the latest app version out the door, and also that we as consumers realise the importance of our data regardless of where we leave it.